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We Can save Us All Adam Nemett
December 06, 2018 02:59 PM PST
itunes pic

Good afternoon everyone and welcome to another edition of The Avid Reader. Today our guest is Adam Nemett, author of We Can Save Us All, his first novel, published just last month by The Unnamed Press.

Adam is a graduate of Princeton, the setting of this book and received his MFA from California College of the Arts.

An excerpt of this book appeared in The Apocalypse Reader, a great book by the way.

We Can Save Us All is a kind of dystopian novel, one that combines a coming disaster, or a series of them, and a band of almost former Princeton students, self-named as superheroes, who live in a compound named the Egg.

They attempt to ameliorate a coming disaster in which the world loses time in an increasingly rapid manner. This process is called chrono strict tesis

There are all kinds of coming climate change disasters as well.

So those in the egg, masterminded by Mathias, come up with a scheme the might stop or stop illusorily this wind down of time.

Our narrator is David. A kind of nebbish who still becomes a hero.

He also longs for a romance with Haley Roth, the love of his life.

She is also a heroine in this book.

In summary, this is a book that in a humorous, but instructing manner tries to show us the nature of men and women, especially young ones as they deal with the possible end of the world as we know it and remain calm and collected until the end.

1Q1A We Can Save Us All Adam Nemett
December 06, 2018 02:57 PM PST
itunes pic

Good afternoon everyone and welcome to another edition of The Avid Reader. Today our guest is Adam Nemett, author of We Can Save Us All, his first novel, published just last month by The Unnamed Press.

Adam is a graduate of Princeton, the setting of this book and received his MFA from California College of the Arts.

An excerpt of this book appeared in The Apocalypse Reader, a great book by the way.

We Can Save Us All is a kind of dystopian novel, one that combines a coming disaster, or a series of them, and a band of almost former Princeton students, self-named as superheroes, who live in a compound named the Egg.

They attempt to ameliorate a coming disaster in which the world loses time in an increasingly rapid manner. This process is called chrono strict tesis

There are all kinds of coming climate change disasters as well.

So those in the egg, masterminded by Mathias, come up with a scheme the might stop or stop illusorily this wind down of time.

Our narrator is David. A kind of nebbish who still becomes a hero.

He also longs for a romance with Haley Roth, the love of his life.

She is also a heroine in this book.

In summary, this is a book that in a humorous, but instructing manner tries to show us the nature of men and women, especially young ones as they deal with the possible end of the world as we know it and remain calm and collected until the end.

1Q1A Hardly Children Laura Adamczyk
December 06, 2018 02:53 PM PST
itunes pic

Good afternoon everyone and welcome to another edition of The Avid Reader. Today our guest is Laura Adamczyk, author of Hardly Children a collection of short stories, and her first book, published by FSG Originals in November.

Laura was born, raised and lives in Illinois. Her writing has appeared in The Chicago Reader, Ninth Letter, Washington Square Review and many other periodicals and collections. She earned her MFA in friction from the University of Illinois.

Hardly Children is an eerie and frankly scary collection of stories that loosely but thematically, both with children and without, weave a skein of thrill, loss, dread, Kafkaesque ,seemingly meaningless, until you think about it afterword, stories of life bereft of hope, confusing but somehow transcendent.

You come away from this book, learning something about yourself, whether you like it or not and finding out that you haven’t been given the key to the story, but rather an unanswered question or a void where you expect a period or an exclamation mark.

In all, I have never read anything like it and was upset when I read the last page. I even dreamed the book. Sometimes when I fell asleep with the book on my chest. But I do that a lot since I’m old.

Anyway, with that, welcome Laura and thanks so much for joining us today.

Hardly Children Laura Adamczyk
December 06, 2018 02:51 PM PST
itunes pic

Good afternoon everyone and welcome to another edition of The Avid Reader. Today our guest is Laura Adamczyk, author of Hardly Children a collection of short stories, and her first book, published by FSG Originals in November.

Laura was born, raised and lives in Illinois. Her writing has appeared in The Chicago Reader, Ninth Letter, Washington Square Review and many other periodicals and collections. She earned her MFA in friction from the University of Illinois.

Hardly Children is an eerie and frankly scary collection of stories that loosely but thematically, both with children and without, weave a skein of thrill, loss, dread, Kafkaesque ,seemingly meaningless, until you think about it afterword, stories of life bereft of hope, confusing but somehow transcendent.

You come away from this book, learning something about yourself, whether you like it or not and finding out that you haven’t been given the key to the story, but rather an unanswered question or a void where you expect a period or an exclamation mark.

In all, I have never read anything like it and was upset when I read the last page. I even dreamed the book. Sometimes when I fell asleep with the book on my chest. But I do that a lot since I’m old.

Anyway, with that, welcome Laura and thanks so much for joining us today.

Dr. H.W. Brands Heirs of the Founders
November 26, 2018 08:43 AM PST
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Good afternoon everyone and welcome to another edition of The Avid Reader. Today our guest is Dr. H.W. Brands. Dr. Brands holds the Jack S. Blanton Sr.. Chair in history at The University of Texas.

An incredibly prolific author of American history and its most evocative and important periods, Dr. Brand has written 25 books, edited at least five others and has published dozens of articles and scores of reviews. He has written for the NYT, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Atlantic and many others.

His latest work is Heirs Of The Founders: The Epic Rivalry of Henry Clay, John Calhoun, and Daniel Webster, The Second Generation of American Giants. published byDoubleday and just released

These three men, successors of our founding fathers, each born within four or five years of The American Revolution, through their rivalry and, in some cases their similarities, helped to forge for good or bad the conditions which led to our great Civil War.

Each had aspirations for the Presidency. Each failed.

However, Clay served as Speaker of the House, and John Quincey Adams’ Secretary of State and forged the Missouri Compromise which indeed was that, allowing one state to remain slave free and the other to hold on to an unspeakable tradition. That alone is an issue that is brought with questions and wonder, and I will ask those questions today.

Calhoun was Vice-President to both John Quincey Adams and andrew Jackson, essentially extolled slavery, the crown of the southern culture. I wonder why he didn’t become President just from sheer tenure. Just as I wonder today about Joe Biden.

And Webster, my favorite, I guess because of Steven Vincent Benet’s short story The Devil and Daniel Webster, was a senator, secretary of state to three presidents and the most gifted courtroom advocates of his time and maybe of any time, save for Clarence Darrow maybe, well he abandoned his anti-slavery position in an attempt to wrest the Presidency from his erstwhile rivals. Once again much as Mitch Mcconnell and Charles Grassley have done today, in their flip-flops on the absurd Presidency of Donald Trump.

In any event and to stop my railing, Dr. Brand has in an accessible and compelling narrative has woven the threads of the lives of these three men, The Great Triumvirate, and given us a good object lesson of the origins of Constitutional Cris and what it can lead to.

1Q1A Dr. H.W. Brands Heirs Of The Founders: The Epic Rivalry of Henry Clay, John Calhoun, and Daniel Webster, The Second Generation of American Giants
November 26, 2018 08:40 AM PST
itunes pic

Good afternoon everyone and welcome to another edition of The Avid Reader. Today our guest is Dr. H.W. Brands. Dr. Brands holds the Jack S. Blanton Sr.. Chair in history at The University of Texas.

An incredibly prolific author of American history and its most evocative and important periods, Dr. Brand has written 25 books, edited at least five others and has published dozens of articles and scores of reviews. He has written for the NYT, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Atlantic and many others.

His latest work is Heirs Of The Founders: The Epic Rivalry of Henry Clay, John Calhoun, and Daniel Webster, The Second Generation of American Giants. published byDoubleday and just released

These three men, successors of our founding fathers, each born within four or five years of The American Revolution, through their rivalry and, in some cases their similarities, helped to forge for good or bad the conditions which led to our great Civil War.

Each had aspirations for the Presidency. Each failed.

However, Clay served as Speaker of the House, and John Quincey Adams’ Secretary of State and forged the Missouri Compromise which indeed was that, allowing one state to remain slave free and the other to hold on to an unspeakable tradition. That alone is an issue that is brought with questions and wonder, and I will ask those questions today.

Calhoun was Vice-President to both John Quincey Adams and andrew Jackson, essentially extolled slavery, the crown of the southern culture. I wonder why he didn’t become President just from sheer tenure. Just as I wonder today about Joe Biden.

And Webster, my favorite, I guess because of Steven Vincent Benet’s short story The Devil and Daniel Webster, was a senator, secretary of state to three presidents and the most gifted courtroom advocates of his time and maybe of any time, save for Clarence Darrow maybe, well he abandoned his anti-slavery position in an attempt to wrest the Presidency from his erstwhile rivals. Once again much as Mitch Mcconnell and Charles Grassley have done today, in their flip-flops on the absurd Presidency of Donald Trump.

In any event and to stop my railing, Dr. Brand has in an accessible and compelling narrative has woven the threads of the lives of these three men, The Great Triumvirate, and given us a good object lesson of the origins of Constitutional Cris and what it can lead to.

Kara Cooney When Women Ruled The World
November 26, 2018 08:35 AM PST
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Good afternoon everyone and welcome to another edition of The Avid Reader. Today our guest is Dr. Kara Cooper. Dr. Cooper is a professor of Egyptian Art and Architecture at UCLA. She’s worked with National Geographic and the Discovery channel. And produced and appeared in a series you may have seen entitled Out Of Egypt which I believe is still available on Amazon and Netflix.

Although she has published prolifically, we may know her best from her first general public book The Woman Who Would Be King: Hat Shep Sut’s Rise To Power. That was released in 2014.

Her latest work is When Women Ruled The World, which is an strikingly accessible journey along the timeline of ancient Egypt, where we find, surprisingly, periods of time in which women ruled the old world. For a number of different reasons.

Along the journey, Dr. Cooney highlights the comparison between the way women were treated in Egyptian history versus the manner in which they find the same treatment in modern society.

Kara Cooney 1Q1A When Women Ruled the World
November 26, 2018 08:34 AM PST
itunes pic

Good afternoon everyone and welcome to another edition of The Avid Reader. Today our guest is Dr. Kara Cooper. Dr. Cooper is a professor of Egyptian Art and Architecture at UCLA. She’s worked with National Geographic and the Discovery channel. And produced and appeared in a series you may have seen entitled Out Of Egypt which I believe is still available on Amazon and Netflix.

Although she has published prolifically, we may know her best from her first general public book The Woman Who Would Be King: Hat Shep Sut’s Rise To Power. That was released in 2014.

Her latest work is When Women Ruled The World, which is an strikingly accessible journey along the timeline of ancient Egypt, where we find, surprisingly, periods of time in which women ruled the old world. For a number of different reasons.

Along the journey, Dr. Cooney highlights the comparison between the way women were treated in Egyptian history versus the manner in which they find the same treatment in modern society.

Black Friday Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah
October 19, 2018 01:59 PM PDT
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Good afternoon everyone and welcome to another edition of The Avid Reader. This week our guest is Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah, author of Friday Black, published in October by Mariner. Nana has an MFA from Syracuse. Has appeared, or will appear, in Esquire, Guernica, Printer’s row and the Breakwater review. He was chosen as one of the five under 35 by the National Book Foundation.

Black Friday displays, in unflinching detail, the cruelty that we inflict upon another and the absurdity of that cruelty, a cruelty serration and repetitious that at some point we begin to see, for good or bad, the humor of it.

The characters that we are introduced to, are uncomfortable in their own skin, whatever color. They know that something wrong, something that that can see or feel, sometimes, but sometimes lurks in shadows that we all create and retain in our own consciousness or psyche.

The weird thing is that this bizarro world type stuff is placed inside our malls, or in a science fiction universe that mulls the boredom and cruelty (again) of our universe and its inhabitants.

This book will survive and when it is read by future generations they will wonder if it tells the story of our world or the story of what our world almost is.

Being a sixty-six year old white Jewish man, at first I thought I could relate to a book like this, but as I read it I realized that it isn’t about black or white. It is about people. What they do and how they can justify doing it. Whoever they might be.

When I interview George Saunders after he wrote The Tenth of December, I really began to understand how the most serious things in life can always be turned into a joke, as I said how fortunate or unfortunate this may be.

With that welcome Nana and thanks for joining us today.

1Q1A Black Friday Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah
October 19, 2018 01:57 PM PDT
itunes pic

Good afternoon everyone and welcome to another edition of The Avid Reader. This week our guest is Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah, author of Friday Black, published in October by Mariner. Nana has an MFA from Syracuse. Has appeared, or will appear, in Esquire, Guernica, Printer’s row and the Breakwater review. He was chosen as one of the five under 35 by the National Book Foundation.

Black Friday displays, in unflinching detail, the cruelty that we inflict upon another and the absurdity of that cruelty, a cruelty serration and repetitious that at some point we begin to see, for good or bad, the humor of it.

The characters that we are introduced to, are uncomfortable in their own skin, whatever color. They know that something wrong, something that that can see or feel, sometimes, but sometimes lurks in shadows that we all create and retain in our own consciousness or psyche.

The weird thing is that this bizarro world type stuff is placed inside our malls, or in a science fiction universe that mulls the boredom and cruelty (again) of our universe and its inhabitants.

This book will survive and when it is read by future generations they will wonder if it tells the story of our world or the story of what our world almost is.

Being a sixty-six year old white Jewish man, at first I thought I could relate to a book like this, but as I read it I realized that it isn’t about black or white. It is about people. What they do and how they can justify doing it. Whoever they might be.

When I interview George Saunders after he wrote The Tenth of December, I really began to understand how the most serious things in life can always be turned into a joke, as I said how fortunate or unfortunate this may be.

With that welcome Nana and thanks for joining us today.

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