History
Icon-add-to-playlist Icon-download Icon-drawer-up
Share this ... ×
...
By ...
Embed:
Copy
Dad's Maybe Book Tim O'Brien
September 28, 2019 10:03 AM PDT
itunes pic

Good afternoon everyone and welcome to another edition of The Avid Reader. Today our guest is Tim O’Brien, best known over the past decades as the author of The Things They Carried, a book that changed my outlook on a lot of things, just as it did for one of the characters in this memoir, (or pretty modest level memoir.)

Tim started off back in the 70s with If I Die In A Combat Zone, Box Me Up and Ship Me Home.

He won the National Book Award for Northern Lights and Going After Cacciato.

His other works include, in part, The Lake of the Woods, Tomcat in Love and July, July.

As you will see in this book, his influences include Hemingway, Conrad, Faulkner .

His collision with truth has run through his novels, if they all are novels, except perhaps with my favorite of his The Nuclear Age.

1Q1A Dad's Maybe Book Tim O'Brien
September 28, 2019 10:01 AM PDT
itunes pic

Good afternoon everyone and welcome to another edition of The Avid Reader. Today our guest is Tim O’Brien, best known over the past decades as the author of The Things They Carried, a book that changed my outlook on a lot of things, just as it did for one of the characters in this memoir, (or pretty modest level memoir.)

Tim started off back in the 70s with If I Die In A Combat Zone, Box Me Up and Ship Me Home.

He won the National Book Award for Northern Lights and Going After Cacciato.

His other works include, in part, The Lake of the Woods, Tomcat in Love and July, July.

As you will see in this book, his influences include Hemingway, Conrad, Faulkner .

His collision with truth has run through his novels, if they all are novels, except perhaps with my favorite of his The Nuclear Age.

The Dutch House Ann Patchett
September 24, 2019 07:10 AM PDT
itunes pic

Good afternoon everyone and welcome to another edition of The Avid Reader. Brought to you by my independent book store, Wellington Square Bookshop. Ann’s is Parnassus Books in Nashville.
So our guest is Ann Patchett who really needs no introduction, but I’ll give one anyway.

Anne has written seven novels including The Magician’s Assistant, State of Wonder and of course Bel Canto.

She’s been the recipient of the Orange Prize, The PEN Faulkner award. And have been NYT Notable books, and so many awards.

Ann’s latest novel is The Dutch House, which will be released tomorrow!

But if you want to be one of the first ones to get a signed copy and to hear part of the book and ask questions about it, you can hear all about it from Ann herself at the Free Library downtown tomorrow, Tuesday the 24th at 7:30.
And if you miss that you can see her at Congregation Keneseth Israel (where I was Bar Mitzvah and also ejected with my brother from Saturday services in front of 2000 people) on Wednesday the 25th from 9:30-11:30 in the morning.

The Dutch House, as in many of Ann’s work, explores the intricacies and emotional upheavals of a family. The story is set in Elkins Park about 30 minutes from where I sit and is very nostalgic for me. I have many connections with that place and that time. But the book’s real main character is a house, an extraordinary house with a history that suffuses, permeates the lives of everyone we meet.

And with that, welcome Ann and thanks so much for joining us today.

1Q1A The Dutch House Ann Patchett
September 24, 2019 07:07 AM PDT
itunes pic

Good afternoon everyone and welcome to another edition of The Avid Reader. Brought to you by my independent book store, Wellington Square Bookshop. Ann’s is Parnassus Books in Nashville.
So our guest is Ann Patchett who really needs no introduction, but I’ll give one anyway.

Anne has written seven novels including The Magician’s Assistant, State of Wonder and of course Bel Canto.

She’s been the recipient of the Orange Prize, The PEN Faulkner award. And have been NYT Notable books, and so many awards.

Ann’s latest novel is The Dutch House, which will be released tomorrow!

But if you want to be one of the first ones to get a signed copy and to hear part of the book and ask questions about it, you can hear all about it from Ann herself at the Free Library downtown tomorrow, Tuesday the 24th at 7:30.
And if you miss that you can see her at Congregation Keneseth Israel (where I was Bar Mitzvah and also ejected with my brother from Saturday services in front of 2000 people) on Wednesday the 25th from 9:30-11:30 in the morning.

The Dutch House, as in many of Ann’s work, explores the intricacies and emotional upheavals of a family. The story is set in Elkins Park about 30 minutes from where I sit and is very nostalgic for me. I have many connections with that place and that time. But the book’s real main character is a house, an extraordinary house with a history that suffuses, permeates the lives of everyone we meet.

And with that, welcome Ann and thanks so much for joining us today.

Everything Inside Edwidge Danticat
September 09, 2019 09:36 AM PDT
itunes pic

Good afternoon everyone and welcome to another edition of The Avid Reader. Today our guest is Edwidge Danticat. Her collection of short stories, Everything Inside was released last month by Knopf. Edwidge has won the Pushcart Prize, the Pen/Faulkner award the American Book Award.

Her novels include The Art of Death, Claire of the Sea Light, Brother, I’m Dying, Breath, Eyes, Memory. The Farming of Bones, Behind the Mountain and the short story collection The Dew Breaker.

Her work has also appeared in the NYT, Time, the New Yorker Harpers and many others.

Everything Inside is a book of and about Haiti. Most of us in this country know little or nothing about this Caribbean country that was first populated by the Taino people, won independence through its slaves, was the first place Columbus set shore on—on his First Voyage in 1492, and it was the second Republic, after us in both North and South America. And the First to abolish slavery.

Edwidge is proud of her country and saddened by the disasters that have befallen it, from political upheaval, Hurricanes to a catastrophic earthquake on January 12, 2010. And even the United Nations has contributed to its grief.

Edwidge was born in Port-au-Prince and came to the US before she was a teenager.

These stories give us a great opportunity to learn more about both Haiti and at the same time allow us to understand more about families, sadness and resolve.

Welcome Edwidge and thanks so much for joining us today.

The Need Helen Phillips
September 09, 2019 09:14 AM PDT
itunes pic

Good afternoon and welcome to another edition of The Avid Reader. Today our guest is Helen Phillips author of The Need published in July by Simon and Schuster.

The Need is Helen’s fifth book, preceded by her children’s book Here Where The Sunbeams are Green, And Yet They Were Happy, The Beautiful Bureaucrat and Some Possible Solutions

Each of which have received various awards. She has also received and it is my favorite award ever—-The Italo Calvino Prize in Fabulist Fiction. On my fabulist bucket list.

Her work has appeared in The Atlantic, NYT, Tin House and many other publications.

The Need is a scary book. It is a funny book, it is a sad book, a tragic book, an heroic book and a book that is really hard to put down.

Do we have an unreliable narrator? I don’t know. Do we have a parallel universe? Beats me. Do we have two matching pennies? I can’t say. Do we like someone or another? But when a book asks you these questions and you can’t answer them, you know someone is on to something.

The Need starts out being something then morphs into something else. funnels, tunnels and as it does our questions begin to rise as do the protagonists.

And our protagonists are two sides of the same coin.

It is a book I will not soon forget maybe with a beatific dream every once in a while with the odd, and I mean odd, nightmare thrown in for good measure.

With that welcome Helen and thanks so much for joining us today.

1Q1A The Need Helen Phillips
September 09, 2019 09:11 AM PDT
itunes pic

Good afternoon and welcome to another edition of The Avid Reader. Today our guest is Helen Phillips author of The Need published in July by Simon and Schuster.

The Need is Helen’s fifth book, preceded by her children’s book Here Where The Sunbeams are Green, And Yet They Were Happy, The Beautiful Bureaucrat and Some Possible Solutions

Each of which have received various awards. She has also received and it is my favorite award ever—-The Italo Calvino Prize in Fabulist Fiction. On my fabulist bucket list.

Her work has appeared in The Atlantic, NYT, Tin House and many other publications.

The Need is a scary book. It is a funny book, it is a sad book, a tragic book, an heroic book and a book that is really hard to put down.

Do we have an unreliable narrator? I don’t know. Do we have a parallel universe? Beats me. Do we have two matching pennies? I can’t say. Do we like someone or another? But when a book asks you these questions and you can’t answer them, you know someone is on to something.

The Need starts out being something then morphs into something else. funnels, tunnels and as it does our questions begin to rise as do the protagonists.

And our protagonists are two sides of the same coin.

It is a book I will not soon forget maybe with a beatific dream every once in a while with the odd, and I mean odd, nightmare thrown in for good measure.

With that welcome Helen and thanks so much for joining us today.

The Lager Queen Of Minnesota J. Ryan Stradal
September 09, 2019 09:01 AM PDT
itunes pic

Good afternoon everyone and welcome to another edition of The Avid Reader. Today our guest is J. Ryan Stradal, author of The Lager Queen Of Minnesota published by Pamela Dorman Books in July.

Ryan is the author of Kitchens Of The Great Midwest, which won numerous awards. He has written for the WSJ, Vanity Fair, McSweeney’s amongst many other publications.

The Lager Queen Of Minnesota is a novel about beer. I guess to a certain extent, beer is one of the protagonists of this story. But the heroine of the book is Edith Magnusson a mistress of pies, a hard worker, and a good person. But because bad things Do come to good people, she is widowed, underemployed and saddled (at first) with taking care of her teenaged granddaughter Beverly.

Edith’s sister is for most of the novel, the polar opposite of Edition. They are estranged because of an act that Helen chooses and Edith chooses to respond.

But once again and in closing this introduction, we learn a lot about beer, the good and bad of it, the making of it and how it can forge friendship, enmity and sometimes, love.

Welcome Ryan and thanks so much for joining us today.

1Q1A The Lager Queen Of Minnesota J. Ryan Stradal
September 09, 2019 08:58 AM PDT
itunes pic

Good afternoon everyone and welcome to another edition of The Avid Reader. Today our guest is J. Ryan Stradal, author of The Lager Queen Of Minnesota published by Pamela Dorman Books in July.

Ryan is the author of Kitchens Of The Great Midwest, which won numerous awards. He has written for the WSJ, Vanity Fair, McSweeney’s amongst many other publications.

The Lager Queen Of Minnesota is a novel about beer. I guess to a certain extent, beer is one of the protagonists of this story. But the heroine of the book is Edith Magnusson a mistress of pies, a hard worker, and a good person. But because bad things Do come to good people, she is widowed, underemployed and saddled (at first) with taking care of her teenaged granddaughter Beverly.

Edith’s sister is for most of the novel, the polar opposite of Edition. They are estranged because of an act that Helen chooses and Edith chooses to respond.

But once again and in closing this introduction, we learn a lot about beer, the good and bad of it, the making of it and how it can forge friendship, enmity and sometimes, love.

Welcome Ryan and thanks so much for joining us today.

1Q1A Lost And Found Orson Scott Card
September 09, 2019 08:47 AM PDT
itunes pic

Good afternoon everyone and welcome to another edition of The Avid Reader. Today our guest is Orson Scott Card, whose latest novel is Lost And Found to be released tomorrow by Blackstone.

Mr. Card needs no introduction but as is my wont, I will give one anyway.

Nobody had won the Hugo and Nebula awards for two novels two years ago until Orson did. For Ender’s Game and Speaker For The Dead and the third of the Enders book Xenocide was just as good as the others and I read each the day that they were released.

And of course Ender didn’t end there.

And so many other books, including the Homecoming Saga and The Tales of Alvin Maker

Lost And Found is a bit of a departure, at least to me, from the other books that I have read by Orson. Ezekiel, (not Zeke) Bliss or Blast (as he prefers) is not a thief. But he finds any number of things and knows who belongs to those things.

His good friend (and good in many senses) is Beth, who as Ezekiel does—-has a micro power, and we all may have micro powers. He has friends who also have varied micro-powers. Not X-men powers, but powers that at first blush seem to be parodies of powers. As we read on, we realize that those tiny powers can make the earth move, can solve crimes, can bring people together.
The book appeals to kids and adults alike as do many of Orson’s work and I mean that as a high compliment.

This book has a great sense of humor, of imagination and intrigue. I loved it and it will be displayed in a special place in my bookstore.

Previous Page  |  Next Page